Jamra primary scholl for children affected by HIV/AIDS, drugs or poverty, Senegal (c) Nell Freeman/Alliance Participants in the Photovioce project, Ecuador © Marcela Nievas for the Alliance
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Alliance event to raise awareness of LGBT rights in Colombia

21
JUL
2011

Aids Alliance

Mauricio Albarracin, a Colombian lawyer and co-author of a new report produced by Colombia Diversa on LGBT rights in Colombia will speak at an event in London on Friday 22 July.

The report, All the Responsibilities, Not Many rights: The Human Rights Situation of Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals and Transgenders (LGBT) in Colombia 2008-09, describes the key human rights issues that members of LGBT communities are confronted with in Colombia.

Anamaria Bejar, the Alliance’s Head of Latin America Team, said: ‘The Alliance began working in Colombia at the end of 2008 through its partner organisation Liga Colombiana contra el Sida.  Liga Sida are one of the largest AIDS service organisations operating in Colombia.’

'The HIV epidemic in Colombia is concentrated among most-at-risk populations, mostly sex workers, men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender people.'

'Despite the high prevalence rate among these groups, they have very limited access to HIV prevention, treatment and care interventions due to structural and cultural barriers such as stigma and discrimination.'

Colombia is plagued with internal armed conflict and violence, resulting in pervasive human rights violations and breaches of international humanitarian law.

This latest research was produced by Colombia Diversa and was co-funded by the Alliance (part of our Latin America Programme Partnership Agreement with the UK’s Department for International Development), along with Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice, the Swedish development agency - SIDA, Diakonia and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

The evidence is presented in six critical themes: police abuse, violence due to prejudice, unequal access to rights as same sex couples, the situation in prisons, forced displacement and the armed conflict, and issues of gender diversity in the media.

One of the most startling statistics in the report is the number of registered murders of LGBT people in 2008-09: 74 violent deaths, 46 crimes resulting from prejudice, and seven murders not motivated by prejudice.

According to the one of the researchers María Mercedes Gómez, ‘Violence resulting from prejudice has a symbolic aim. It is a message sent directly to a community, inscribed, even, on individual bodies’.

Follow these links for an executive summary of the report, in Spanish and in English.

For more information on the event in London on Friday 22 July, click here.

    Violence resulting from prejudice has a symbolic aim. It is a message sent directly to a community, inscribed, even, on individual bodies.