Jamra primary scholl for children affected by HIV/AIDS, drugs or poverty, Senegal (c) Nell Freeman/Alliance Participants in the Photovioce project, Ecuador © Marcela Nievas for the Alliance
  • Home > News > Key Correspondents make their first video

Key Correspondents make their first video

2
SEP
2010

Aids Alliance

Key Correspondents, who are community-based writers representing those affected by and living with HIV, have made a new video about their work.


The video was filmed during the International AIDS Conference in Vienna where a team of 20 Key Correspondents (KCs) were reporting from the event.

KCs used handheld flip video cameras to film video diary style entries and general footage from around the conference. These were then combined with interviews of individual KCs, KC programme staff and the Alliance’s Executive Director Alvaro Bermejo.

The video illustrates how conference attendance is one of the core programme activities and sees KCs interviewing members of civil society and conference delegates.

Combined with training workshops and long-distance editing and mentoring, conference activities help build KCs’ capacity in writing and advocacy.

These skills help them document the reality in their local communities and ensure that those who are not able to tell their stories have a way to be heard.

The KCs attending Vienna wrote more than 70 stories from the conference, which can be found here. Some KCs’ had their stories published in their national press, including in Zimbabwe and Thailand.

A number of KCs also took photographs at the conference which can be viewed via the KC team photo pool here.

Other than a touch of camera shyness, KCs said the video cameras were exciting and easy to use. The programme staff are now evaluating the possibility of KCs using these tools in the field.

It is hoped video, photography and audio could be utilised as effective tools for those KCs with low literacy levels or living in rural areas, where access to computers or the internet is poor, in enabling them to ‘speak their world’.

    video is an effective tool for kcs with low literacy levels or living in rural areas